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This paper focuses on the use of technology – specifically knowledge management systems – to facilitate organizational learning and innovation processes. However, it is vital to note that the primary determinant of the effectiveness of such systems relates to the nature of the organization's culture. Those organizations that have successfully implemented organizational learning principles emphasize the importance of building a culture where knowledge development and sharing is both valued and rewarded (Alavi and Leidner, 2001; Brown and Daguid, 1996; DiBella et al., 1996). The building of trust in both the technology and people using the technology for learning and innovation practices underlies the success of knowledge management and knowledge management systems. As the work of D'Aveni (1994) and Teece et al. (1997) indicates, the long-term viability of any firm operating in dynamic and complex environments will ultimately be determined by its ability to learn and innovate successfully. While the innovation research has tended to discuss and consider transformative and absorptive capacities as separate and distinct constructs, an argument can be made that all firm

This paper focuses on the use of technology – specifically knowledge management systems – to facilitate organizational learning and innovation processes. However, it is vital to note that the primary determinant of the effectiveness of such systems relates to the nature of the organization’s culture. Those organizations that have successfully implemented organizational learning principles emphasize the importance of building a culture where knowledge development and sharing is both valued and rewarded (Alavi and Leidner, 2001; Brown and Daguid, 1996; DiBella et al., 1996). The building of trust in both the technology and people using the technology for learning and innovation practices underlies the success of knowledge management and knowledge management systems.

As the work of D’Aveni (1994) and Teece et al. (1997) indicates, the long-term viability of any firm operating in dynamic and complex environments will ultimately be determined by its ability to learn and innovate successfully. While the innovation research has tended to discuss and consider transformative and absorptive capacities as separate and distinct constructs, an argument can be made that all firm innovation involves the meshing of transformative and absorptive capacities to facilitate the merging of externally and internally generated knowledge to generate new products and services. While the consideration of both of these capacities as separate entities has advanced our understanding of innovative organizational activities, we have reached a point where the merging of these complementary perspectives will provide a more comprehensive picture of innovation behaviors.

Garry, L. A., & Bruce, T. L. (2003). Knowlege management systems and developing sustainable competitive advantage. Journal of Knowledge Management, 7(2), 142-142. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/230329840?accountid=32521

Knowledge management (KM) is the systematic and organized attempt to use knowledge within an organization to improve performance, and for many companies, in a wide range of industries. The issue of companies being overwhelmed by the sheer volume of information held within their systems has been highlighted as a key finding in a recent survey conducted by KPMG Consulting. Despite the human hurdles still to be overcome, there is little doubt that most major organizations recognize knowledge management as an essential business tool, and understand the potential role that it can play in providing competitive advantage. The key KM adoption issues have less to do with implementing the necessary technology than with running a complete KM program, and as yet most organizations do not have a fully integrated KM system.

The “knowledge management” glut. (2000). Strategic Direction, 16(9), 29-31. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/218630833?accountid=32521

paper implies that besides utilizing market orientation for innovative practices, the high-tech industry should focus more on market knowledge and customer knowledge management. In high-tech industries, the process of knowledge management, which transfers customer knowledge to product innovation, can effectively seize market information. Originality/value – This study examines the mediating effects of market knowledge and customer knowledge management and clarifies the relational inconsistencies between market orientation and product innovation performance from knowledge management viewpoints.

Ru-Jen Lin, Rong-Huei Che, & Chiu-Yao Ting. (2012). Turning knowledge management into innovation in the high-tech industry. Industrial Management + Data Systems, 112(1), 42-63. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/02635571211193635

This paper focuses on the use of technology – specifically knowledge management systems – to facilitate organizational learning and innovation processes. However, it is vital to note that the primary determinant of the effectiveness of such systems relates to the nature of the organization’s culture. Those organizations that have successfully implemented organizational learning principles emphasize the importance of building a culture where knowledge development and sharing is both valued and rewarded (Alavi and Leidner, 2001; Brown and Daguid, 1996; DiBella et al., 1996). The building of trust in both the technology and people using the technology for learning and innovation practices underlies the success of knowledge management and knowledge management systems.

As the work of D’Aveni (1994) and Teece et al. (1997) indicates, the long-term viability of any firm operating in dynamic and complex environments will ultimately be determined by its ability to learn and innovate successfully. While the innovation research has tended to discuss and consider transformative and absorptive capacities as separate and distinct constructs, an argument can be made that all firm innovation involves the meshing of transformative and absorptive capacities to facilitate the merging of externally and internally generated knowledge to generate new products and services. While the consideration of both of these capacities as separate entities has advanced our understanding of innovative organizational activities, we have reached a point where the merging of these complementary perspectives will provide a more comprehensive picture of innovation behaviors.

Garry, L. A., & Bruce, T. L. (2003). Knowlege management systems and developing sustainable competitive advantage. Journal of Knowledge Management, 7(2), 142-142. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/230329840?accountid=32521

Knowledge management (KM) is the systematic and organized attempt to use knowledge within an organization to improve performance, and for many companies, in a wide range of industries. The issue of companies being overwhelmed by the sheer volume of information held within their systems has been highlighted as a key finding in a recent survey conducted by KPMG Consulting. Despite the human hurdles still to be overcome, there is little doubt that most major organizations recognize knowledge management as an essential business tool, and understand the potential role that it can play in providing competitive advantage. The key KM adoption issues have less to do with implementing the necessary technology than with running a complete KM program, and as yet most organizations do not have a fully integrated KM system.

The “knowledge management” glut. (2000). Strategic Direction, 16(9), 29-31. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/218630833?accountid=32521

paper implies that besides utilizing market orientation for innovative practices, the high-tech industry should focus more on market knowledge and customer knowledge management. In high-tech industries, the process of knowledge management, which transfers customer knowledge to product innovation, can effectively seize market information. Originality/value – This study examines the mediating effects of market knowledge and customer knowledge management and clarifies the relational inconsistencies between market orientation and product innovation performance from knowledge management viewpoints.

Ru-Jen Lin, Rong-Huei Che, & Chiu-Yao Ting. (2012). Turning knowledge management into innovation in the high-tech industry. Industrial Management + Data Systems, 112(1), 42-63. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/02635571211193635

Knowledge sharing is very important and can be in the form of training or techniques or new technology demands though management.

Behnke, T. M. (2010). Knowledge sharing at work: An examination of organizational antecedents. St. Ambrose University). ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, , 75-n/a. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/305267546?accountid=32521. (305267546).
Knowledge sharing is very important and can be in the form of training or techniques or new technology demands though management.

Behnke, T. M. (2010). Knowledge sharing at work: An examination of organizational antecedents. St. Ambrose University). ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, , 75-n/a. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/305267546?accountid=32521. (305267546).

Interested in a PLAGIARISM-FREE paper based on these particular instructions?...with 100% confidentiality?

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